Tag Archives: Winter

Winter Rose Prunning

Winter Rose Pruning.

January is a good time, in the mild South-East of England to carry out rose pruning. The principal reason for pruning roses is to maintain health and vigour. The removal of dead and diseased and damaged wood is particularly important in roses. They are prone to a variety of aliments and when planted in their traditional form on mass in a roses garden disease can spread with ease. So good rose health is important and winter pruning is a way to improve this. The pruning is not just about removing dead and diseased wood but also about improving the shape of the plant and possibly it’s size but also to maintain an open ‘airy’ habit that will help prevent disease being harboured and spread.

Basic techniques: an angled cut 5mm above an outward baring bud. For cutting out dead and old wood to remove it from the rose, a square flush cut.

stunning-roses-at-mottisfont-abbey

stunning roses at Mottisfont Abbey

So you can enjoy healthy roses with a long flowering season in the year to come.

R. Ruby Wedding. Hybrid-tea

R. Ruby Wedding. Hybrid-tea

Hybrid Teas: Remove any shoots that are dead,diseased or damaged, cutting back to healthy wood. Position cuts to encourage outward growth that will not cross the centre or other stems. Shorten all remaining growth down to a height of 20cm above ground level.

R. The Queen Elizabeth. Floribundas

R. The Queen Elizabeth. Floribundas

Floribundas: Cut out all dead,damaged and diseased wood back to healthy growth or remove to the base of the plant. Remove any stems that are rubbing or likely to rub against one another. Shorten any laterals back to 2 -3 buds from the main stem, cutting to an outward facing bud. Shorten the remaining stems to 25 -30cm from ground level.

R. Arizona sunset. Patio-miniture

R. Arizona sunset. Patio-miniture

Patio/Miniature: Remove any dead,diseased or damaged growth. Relieve congestion by cutting out the oldest stems entirely. Tip prune main stems to remove any of last seasons flowers. Prune any laterals back to within 1 or 2 buds of the main stem.

R. Iceberg. Stanard

R. Iceberg. Stanard

Standard: Remove all dead, damaged and diseased growth, back to main stem. Remove any crossing shoots that may damage another stem by rubbing. Main stems shorten to suitably-placed buds and shoots, laterals cut back to a healthy bud.

R. Iceberg. Stanard

R. Moyesii. Species

Species: Completely remove 1 or 2 old,very woody stems to the base. Remove all dead,damaged diseased wood. Remove all week stems. Remove all crossing stems that are likely to rub. Shorten all laterals to a side shoot or bud 5 -15cm from the main stem.

Old Garden Roses: Alba, Bourbon, China, Damask, Gallica, Mose, Portland, Provence Roses are all pruned the same way.

R. Great Maidens blush. Alba

R. Great Maidens blush. Alba

Remove all dead, damaged and diseased wood cutting back to healthy growth or cutting to the ground. Remove any stems that are rubbing. Cut back the main stems by about 1/3rd . Reduce laterals by about 1/3rd to a strong healthy outward facing bud. Remove all low arching stems that will touch the ground.

R. Madame isaac pereire. Bourbon

R. Madame isaac pereire. Bourbon

R. cecile brunner.China

R. cecile brunner.China

R. Madam Hardy.Damask

R. Madam Hardy.Damask

R. Tricolore-de-flandre-Gallica

R. Tricolore-de-flandre-Gallica

R. William Lobb. Mose

R. William Lobb. Mose

R. Jacques Roses. Portland

R. Jacques Roses. Portland

R. The Bishop. Provence

R. The Bishop. Provence

New English Shrub and Rugosa

R. Penelope.New English shrub

R. Penelope.New English shrub

Are pruned the same way.

R. Rugosa alba. Rugosa

R. Rugosa alba. Rugosa

Remove all dead, damaged, diseased and rubbing growth back to healthy wood. When growth becomes crowded remove 1 or 2 of the older stems that have become unproductive down to the base. To maintain a compact habit and encourage good flowering tip prune a proportion of the side shoots on the outer edges of the plant.

R. Pink bells .Groundcover

R. Pink bells .Groundcover

Ground Cover: These roses live up to their name with vigorous spreading habit, with side stems arching and hitting the ground, rooting and marching ever onwards so little pruning is required apart from ‘crowd control’ and removing any dead or diseased wood to healthy growth and pruning back hard to the base any stems heading skywards.

All this hard and very thorny work will give you healthy and free flowing plants that will look and smell wonderful come peak rose flowering season in June. If it is all sounding a bit too much like hard work, then I know a woman who can help you out! Give me a ring now on Tel:01273 470753 to book your January/February rose pruning session in.

Roses at David Austin garden-and-plant-centre

Roses at David Austin garden-and-plant-centre

Christmas Rose- The Winter Wonders of the Hellebore.

a-sweep-of-hellaborus

a-sweep-of-hellaborus

The Hellaborus genus are a group of woodland edge plants which thrives in partial shade and well drained humus rich soils and flower from December to May. Their mounds of evergreen foliage and delicate flowers lift the spirits in the darkest of winter days.

H. orientallis

H. orientallis

Hellaborus orientallis: Mounds of dark glossy green palmate foliage up to 60cm high,with flower stems lasting from late February to early May. The colours vary from white, cream, with pink and purple speckles, to dusky purple to light green, the nodding flower heads give way to attractive seed heads in May.

H. niger

H. niger

Helleborus niger: Green/grey foliage held in 30cm high mounds with open white saucer shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens on pink stems. Flowering late December to March.

H.argutifolius

H.argutifolius

Helleborus argutifolius: A wonderful free seeding thug, that has a foliage and habit with the wow factor! Strong upright stems to 60cm high hold deeply palmate glaucous leaves which are heavily toothed. Great stems of multiple pea green flowers from March to May.

H.foetidus

H.foetidus

Helleborus foetidus: The native British hellebore. With clumps of deeply divided glossy green leaves in attractive mounds up to 60cm. Free flowering of small green flowers with a purple edge from February to April. Seeds freely.

To get the greatest impact out of planting these brilliant herbaceous perennials, plant them in sweeps and clumps to give a flowering impact. Also to best view their delicate flowers which tend to nod downwards, planting on a bank or raised bed can display them at their best. If as the flower stems emerge and at the point the buds are to open, then some subtle cutting back of the leaves might be carried out so the flowers can be seen in all their glory. Also like all plants that are flowering in winter early spring, chose a spot close to the house or along side a path or near the garage or shed where they will be easy to enjoy.

hellabores-adding-colour-to-the-winter-garden

hellabores-adding-colour-to-the-winter-garden

Helleborus black spot: An unsightly disease that effects mostly the foliage with large spreading black spots but can also effect the stems and flower buds, to treat infected plants cut out all effected parts and to prevent it spreading to other Hellebores. Most strong plants will cope with an attack and just need the effected areas pruned out and will make healthy new growth. The diseased material must be binned or burnt straight away, to help prevent spreading. do not compost.

The scented winter garden

Scent in the winter garden has to be the best reason to brave the winter weather and get out there and enjoy it. Well positioned winter flowering shrubs close to paths, back and front doors and on route from the log store or garage can lift the spirits and remind us all that even in the depths of a gloomy winter there can be something ‘Rosie’ in the garden. Many winter flowering shrubs have almost insignificant flowers but punch well above their weight when it comes to scent. Here are a few of my favourites;

Daphne: a wonderful shrub with a good compact habit, two of my favourites varieties that will grow well on chalk are. D. mezereum, upright habit with small rose pink flowers on bare stems from February into March and pack a heady slightly citrusy scent.

D.mezereum

D.mezereum

Also the evergreen D. odora ‘Aureomarginata’, a neat mound forming shrub with mid-green glossy foliage with a cream edged leaves. The waxy flowers are held in small clusters pink in bud opening to cream and are highly scented.

D. orda 'Aureomarginata'

D. orda ‘Aureomarginata’

Mahonia: a dramatic architectural evergreen shrub from large to smaller varieties, with striking foliage, glossy dark-green pinnate leaves, with holly like edges, cover upright stems to give a distinctive habit.

M. ‘Charity’ out of the whirls of radiating leaves long racemes of clear yellow fragrant flowers, are produced from December through January.

M. x media'charity'

M. x media’charity’

M.trifolioliata ‘Winter Sun’, leaves of three spiny heavily veined leaflets. Mid-yellow flowers strongly fragrant, in late winter early spring, followed by clusters of redcurrant like berries.

M.trifoliolate 'Winter Sun

M.trifoliolate ‘Winter Sun

Lonciera: There is much more to the genus of Lonicera than the twisting climbing honeysuckle. The winter flowering shrub is much to celebrate.

L. fragrantissima x purpusii, arching branches, semi-evergreen shrub. It has delicate flowers held in pairs up the stem and sweetly scented, late December, through January and into February and beyond, the flowers hanging on as the new leaf growth appears.

L.fragrantissma x purpusii

L.fragrantissma x purpusii

Sarcococca: a marvellous low growing glossy green evergreen shrub, which is invaluable in any small garden for a semi-shady area. The indistinct white ‘hairy’ flowers are held on the stems peaking out through the foliage, they may not be much to look at but their powerful scent can be smelt several meters away. The shrub flowers, January into February and in mild winters sometimes in December. Flowers followed by black round fruits. Good varieties are, S. hookerana digyna ‘purple stem’ erect habit with purple stems.

S.hookeriana digyna 'purple stem'

S.hookeriana digyna ‘purple stem’

S.confusa, a dense low spreading habit making it a perfect ground cover shrub.

S.confusa

S.confusa

Planting and sighting of winter shrubs should be give some thought. They need to be near the house or on a regular route travelled, not stuck out in the outer reaches of the garden where a boggy lawn has to be traversed to get to them. Also to get the full effect of the scent an enclosed planting area or court yard will give best results. All of the shrubs I have suggest, apart from the Mahonia,can be used as cut flowers, a small poise brought into the house can fill a room with delightful scent even on the those bleak winter days.

However scented shrubs are just one of the ingredients to a successfully planted winter garden. I have created many winter plantings through out my years in landscaping. With evergreen textures and leaf colours, to winter flowering herbaceous plants and shrubs. Plant seed heads can offer a dramatic element especially when frost is added. Chipped evergreens and good architectural shaped shrubs form invaluable back drops. Also the stunning use of coloured stems of coppiced shrubs and trees. Shrubs and trees that hold their berries through the winter months deserve their place. Grasses in mounds and great sweeps both deciduous and evergreen inter- planted with early bulbs are a must. All these plants form important ingredients to make a stunning winter garden to be enjoyed. So get planting, or if you need help? I know a woman who can, give me a ring, 01273 470753.